The Detective’s Guide – Modern Slavery: Investigating Human Trafficking by Ryan Cantrell

Author’s Note:  I just started reading the book yesterday.  This series of posts will quote freely and paraphrase from Mr. Cantrell’s book, and also contain original and more detailed material. The purpose of this series of articles is to obtain federal block grant funding pursuant to the TVPA. 

After the vast and all encompassing business of drug dealing, human trafficking is tied with the illegal arms trade as the second largest criminal enterprise on the planet, and human trafficking is also the fastest growing. Understanding human trafficking is an important international and local issue.

According to the estimate of the Department of State, roughly 800,000 people are trafficked across borders each year.  If trafficking within countries is included in the total world figures, official U.S. estimates indicate that some 2 to 4 million people are trafficked annually. As many as 17,500 people are believed to be trafficked into the United States each year and some have estimated that 100,000 U.S. children are victims of trafficking within the United States.  

VTVPA Section 107(c)(3): Authority to Permit Continued Presence In the United States. Federal law enforcement officials may permit an alien individual’s continued presence in the United States, if after an assessment, it is determined that such individual is a victim of a severe form of trafficking and a potential witness to such trafficking, in order to effectuate prosecution of those responsible, and such officials in investigating and prosecuting traffickers shall protect the safety of trafficking victims, including taking measures to protect trafficked persons and their family members from intimidation threats of reprisals, and reprisals from traffickers and their associates.

In addition to commercial sex acts with persons under the age of eighteen human trafficking often also intersects the broad range of other crimes including racketeer influenced criminal organizations that deal in drugs, gambling and prostitution. 

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